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Sometimes, pictures tell more than written stories. Enjoy some of photos from various moments of my life, arranged in different galleries.

The last trip of the year 2018


After a very, very busy year (when it comes to travelling), the trip to the Philippines appears to be the last international trip of 2018.

The gallery shows the images of Baguio and Manila.

The visit to Baguio was related to my visit of the post-typhoon recovery projects that my organisation supports.

Then a trip to Manila involves a free weekend off (with some sightseeing)… and meetings with colleagues on workplaces for 2019!

Enjoy the pictures!

Archives: Iberian Peninsula with people that you love

September and October 2018 was very kind to me, when it comes to spending time with people that are important to me. First, I visited Tahir & friends in Toronto, then met with very dear friends of mine in Jakarta, after that in Warsaw, then with wonderful friends in Brussels, and finally I spend some time with Mum and my dear Polish neighbours in Obidos. If this was not enough, I am going to meet a wonderful friend from my high school in Singapore next weekend!

Spending time with friends and family is even more precious, when one visits beautiful places. Portugal and Spain are definitely some of the nicest countries on the planet, and there is no doubt that touring the sites with Mum and friends was very special.

Look up this link to have a glimpse of what we have seen and experienced.

Archives: Earthquake and tsunami in Lombok and Sulawesi of Indonesia

Please note that pictures in this gallery may be found disturbing or graphic to some viewers, as they present extreme destruction and humanitarian suffering.


On 28th September 2018, in the evening hours, Central Sulawesi of Indonesia was struck by the earthquake of 7.7 magnitude RS. The earthquake caused massive destruction in the City of Palu, and triggered a strong tsunami, as well as mudslides and phenomenon called ‘soil liquefaction’ across City of Palu, Sigu and in costal areas of Dongala. The Palu disaster follows the devastating earthquake that had hit the island of Lombok three months earlier. This gallery shows images of the destruction and humanitarian response to both of the crises (Palu and Lombok).

At the time of writing, the official figures suggest that at least 5,000 lost their lives and thousands people got injured (Sulawesi). However, it is clear that the number of people will increase dramatically, as more excavations are done. We all fear that the death toll could exceed 20,000 people.

The calamities caused apocalyptic destruction with ten of thousands houses being turned into rubble. Roads, electricity, water networks, hospitals, schools, shops, hotels are all destroyed or damaged.

The disaster has brought many people within Indonesia and some from outside of the country joining hands to help those surviving the disaster. But what is the most impressive is the solidarity and self-support of the families that survived themselves. People just do whatever they can to help one another - thus trying to cope with the loss of their loved ones or their possessions.

This gallery of pictures is a tribute to victims and survivors of this terrible tragedy, and to those doing whatever they can to help.
You can view pictures, by clicking this link.

Archives: Visiting Tahir and friends in Toronto

After years of waiting, the dream of seeing Tahir as a free man comes true. Tahir is in Canada, legal, free of fear, able to build his own life.

This gallery of pictures shows my visit to Canada, my visit to his new beginnings.
Click here to view the gallery.

Archives: A day in Krakow with Mum

A short day in Krakow on the way to Toronto. Spending time with Mama was wonderful. We chatted, laughed, had good food and walked endlessly. See it for yourself!

Archives: Visiting the Pacific again

Six months after the cyclone Gita devastated the nation of Tonga, it is time to visit the nation - as well as Fiji to learn how the communities recovered from the disaster. Explore the pictures from Hong Kong, Fiji and Tonga to learn about the trip to this fascinating part of the world.

Archives: Ko Chang for the last time?

We made it to Koh Chang with Tahir and his friend Shazi... I came here with an expectation to rest, after exhausting month at work. But, while we were in Koh Change, we received a message from the Canadian authorities saying that the decision for his resettlement to Canada has been taken. A frustrating part is that we do not know what the decision is... They will communicate it to Tahir within next few days... Needless to say, how stressful we are... And perhaps, it is the last holiday together in Thailand?

Enjoy the pictures and view them
by clicking at this link.

Archives: Race against the time

Monsoon rains are arriving to Bangladesh. While rains are a blessing to farmers in many parts of the country, they are a real curse to the Rohingya refugees of Myanmar, who found refuge in the southern region of Bangladesh, around Cox’s Bazar.

The area is home to the largest refugee camp in the world, often referred to as ‘The Magacamp of Kutupalong’, where some 600,000 people live. There are smaller camps in its vicinity too, bringing the total population of refugees in this tiny part of Bangladesh to around 1 million.

While the people of Bangladesh are very hospitable, accommodating to their guests and always happy to lend the helping hand to the their guests, the mother nature is far less favourable. The camps are located among steep hills, which are mainly composed of sands. These areas are completely inappropriate for building any kind of residential infrastructure, let alone shelters for one million people! The main worry is that the heavy rains cause hills slide, valleys flood: which is a source of a grave danger to safety of people living there. The risks are not only related to immediate danger to body integrity (especially being buried in landslides), but also to public health issues. Flooding in the area with little and poor sanitation infrastructure, with poor access to potable water, in the area that is severely overcrowded makes the people extremely vulnerable to water-borne diseases, such as cholera, or diseases such as malaria or hepatitis A (and many, many others). Rains and muddy road also make it so much more challenging to bring supplies. Getting food, medicines, or anything else becomes a logistical nightmare!
So the race with time continues. Refugees and aid agencies of all sorts try prepare to minimise the effects of the disaster that will strike on many fronts. Reinforcing houses, levelling hills, building flood protection trenches, reinforcing mud roads, moving people to safer grounds, stocking up on medicines, vaccinating people, making latrines safer… The tasks are overwhelming, and we will clearly not be ready - however hard we try - we are just out of time already. However, as the struggle continues, the hope carries on too.

I salute the refugees, countless Bangladesh communities of Cox’s Bazar and countless number of aid workers trying to get ready for the emergency to come! Please look at the pictures here to admire their work and the beauty (yes, I insist saying - BEAUTY) of the camps!